Tag Archives: American economy

Business & Design: Less is More

The Growing Trend Towards Smaller Homes

2013_01_23_grabb_13172_3_rsznARCHITECTS Prefabricated ‘Micro Apartment’ Building

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In late January the Bloomberg administration announced the winner of the AdApt NYC competition, which sought to imagine the future of housing in New York City.  The winning proposal, by a team including nARCHITECTS, developers Monadnock, and the Actors Fund HD, will begin construction at 335 East 27th Street next year.  Their scheme, “My Micro NY,” calls for nine stories of long, thin apartments stepped back from the street.  Each apartment will be prefabricated in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and arranged on site using a crane, saving precious construction days and millions of dollars.  Here’s the link to the story on Curbed.com if you’d like to learn more.

Reading about the project peaked my curiosity about housing trends around the rest of the country in this post recession era.  There’s some very interesting data that clearly suggests the trend toward smaller homes is not limited to urban areas.  You might find it interesting.

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Fringe Element

Could the return of trim be an indicator of economic recovery?

Alex-papachristidis-home-1112-xl3Alex Papchristidis’s Manhattan living room courtesy Elle Decor

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I dislike the word ‘trend’.  It’s always seemed to me that the most creative design professionals have an intellectual process behind their work that transcends what’s currently fashionable.

With that in mind, it’s hard to deny the trend away from specifying trim during the downturn of the American economy in recent years.  Honestly, can you remember the last editorial in which trims were prominently featured?  It seems that everyone (except perhaps for Ann Getty) got the ‘less is more’ memo.

That all changed when Elle Decor published Alex Papachristidis and Scott Nelson’s Manhattan apartment last fall, resplendent with colorful gimp, moss fringe, and key tassels.

Flipping through the pages (which seemed to channel Robert Denning & Vincent Fourcade) I began wondering.  Could the return of trim be an indicator of economic recovery?

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